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Linking words activity

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In the following article on Nuclear Hazards you must choose the correct linking words from each dropdown. Then click Show correct answer to compare your answer to the correct answer.

Select the linking words

There are three separate sources of hazard related to the use of nuclear reactors to supply us with energy. , the radioactive material must travel from its place of manufacture to the power station in containers that are not solidly built. Unfortunately, the two normal methods of transport, road or rail, both involve close contact with the general public, the routes are bound to pass near, or even through, heavily populated areas.

, there is the problem of waste. The wastes that all nuclear power stations produce will, in most cases, remain radioactive for thousands of years and cannot be de-activated, they must be stored: they may be buried under the ground, dropped into disused mineshafts, or sunk in the sea. these methods do not solve the problem; they merely store it, an earthquake could crack open the containers like nuts.

there is the problem of accidental exposure due to a leak or an explosion at the power station. this is extremely unlikely, it can happen, as the inhabitants of Harrisburg will tell you.

Separately, these three types of risk are no great cause for concern. taken together, and especially over much longer periods, the probability of a disaster is extremely high.

Correct answer

There are three separate sources of hazard related to the use of nuclear reactors to supply us with energy. Firstly, the radioactive material must travel from its place of manufacture to the power station in containers that are not solidly built. Unfortunately, the two normal methods of transport, road or rail, both involve close contact with the general public, since the routes are bound to pass near, or even through, heavily populated areas.

Secondly, there is the problem of waste. The wastes that all nuclear power stations produce will, in most cases, remain radioactive for thousands of years and cannot be de-activated, so they must be stored: for example they may be buried under the ground, dropped into disused mineshafts, or sunk in the sea. However these methods do not solve the problem; they merely store it, since an earthquake could crack open the containers like nuts.

Thirdly,there is the problem of accidental exposure due to a leak or an explosion at the power station. Although this is extremely unlikely, it can happen, as the inhabitants of Harrisburg will tell you.

Separately, these three types of risk are no great cause for concern. However taken together, and especially over much longer periods, the probability of a disaster is extremely high.

Commentary

Correct! The very first sentence indicates that three points will follow; and this sentence contains the first of those three points. Try again. You have just mentioned that there are three sources of hazard. Think about how you would let people know that you are about to start to explain the first of these.

Correct! This word heralds an explanation of why road and rail transport involve close contact with the public. Try again. You are looking for a work that will indicate that an explanation is following.

Correct! This linking word reminds readers that they are in the middle of a list of three points (started by the previous paragraph). This kind of 'signposting' helps readers keep track of where the argument is taking them. Try again. You are about to talk about the next of the three hazards. You have already mentioned the first. Think about how to indicate to your reader that you are about to mention the next.

Correct! This word indicates the relationship of the new point (the need for storage) to the previous point (that it is not possible to de-activate the waste). Try again. You are looking for a word that indicates a relationship between the the previous point and the need for storage.

Correct! An easy-to-remember but essential linking word. Try again. You are about to provide a list of ways in which waste can be stored. Your linking word should indicate this.

Correct! Another very useful linking word that indicates a conflict or contrast is going to appear. Here, although a solution (burial) has been achieved, it doesn't actually solve a problem. Try again. You are looking for a linking word that indicates a conflict or contrast.

Correct! This words leads us on to the conclusion of the previous statement (that the containers merely store the problem rather than solving it). Try again. You are looking for a word that will conclude the previous statement.

Correct! Again, this reminds us that we are dealing with a list of points. This becomes more and more important the further away from the initial statement we are. We can very quickly start to forget that there are three (or five or nine) points that will be made. Try again. You are about to explain the next point in your list. Your linking word should indicate where you are in the list.

Correct! The 'although' indicates another pertinent, but contrasting, piece of information will come later in the sentence. This sentence compares the transportation of waste (a hazardous endeavour) to the relatively safer situation of keeping it at a power station. Try again. You are looking for a word that indicates a contrasting piece of information is following.

However – Correct! This introduces a contrasting situation in which the risks are considered jointly rather than separately. Try again. You are about to present a contrasting situation. The linking word should reflect this.